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IGC Annual Champions

Meeting

International Gender Champions-Geneva Annual Meeting. hosted by Ambassador Julian Braithwaite at the UK Residence

We were delighted to update fellow champions at the Annual IGC Champions Meeting about Impacts made in 2017 which are considerable, including

First Hubs Established  New York launched March 2017  Vienna launched June 2017

Hubs in Formation Nairobi Dec 2017

Honorary Champions: President Michelle Bachelet, Chile

Foreign Minister Margot Wallström, Sweden

IGC IMPACT GROUPS: Led by Champion Ambassadors, IOs, NGOs for a clear working mandate 2017

IGC Representation Impact Group: Co-Chairs: Sweden, Afghanistan, ILO

1. NGO Convening on Representation 2. Representation Event Champions & Young Women Leaders 3. Ambassador Lunches on Treaty Body Balance, SP…

IGC Change Management Impact Group: Co-Chairs: UK, UNAIDS 1. Inclusion Training. All day event. 30 Organizations 2. UNLOCK for Change. Follow up Event 3. Checklist for Champions

IGC Trade Impact Group: Co-Chairs: Iceland, Sierra Leone, ITC 1. Year-long work plan involving Trade Community on actions including training, TPRs, etc 2. Declaration on Trade and Women’s Economic Empowerment at MC11

IGC Health Impact Group: Stand Alone Action Co-Chairs: Colombia, Sweden, UK, Graduate Institute 1. Focus: WHO D-G election & gender equality 2. Call To Action signed by EB member Champions 3. Call To Action published in The Lancet

Completely delighted to speak to all the Champion colleagues who made it across the bridge.

And proud to deliver the following remarks:

 

REMARKS Annual Champions Meeting November 2017

Caitlin Kraft-Buchman Women@theTable

 

Bonsoir mes amis!

 

It’s a special honor for me as one of the three founders of International Gender Champions with Director General Michael Møller, and former US Ambassador Pam Hamamoto, to be here with you today and give a resume of what we’ve accomplished this year.

 

We’ve had a banner second year! We’ve spread the panel pledge throughout our buildings and our city making it unacceptable, if not yet obsolete, to have a single sex panel on any topic.

We’ve dug into our individual Commitments, that everyone will report on for the second time through the SURVEY that has just opened online to you and your focal points (We hope reflections on the Survey while you are filling it out inspire you to make even more ambitious commitments for 2018 than the ones made for this year.)

 

The 2017 Survey will serve as the data basis for the Annual Report launching IWD 2018

Indeed we now have so many gender equality conversations in Geneva we are planning to have an International Women’s Week ( instead of a Day ! this year so that we can really profile the amazing work of our movement instead of cramming it all into one exhausting too short day.

 

(And so we hope that you will all work together to give one day each to sectors such as Representation, Trade, Humanitarian gender Action, etc…)

 

We have seen expansion and new hubs and impact groups,

And this organic flow is what Stanford has determined to be the THREE essential steps in movement towards gender equality:

 

The very first step is to “fix the numbers of women”. Which we are trying to do with the Panel Pledge, with many of our commitments, and in particular with the SG’s parity strategy focusing on increasing women's participation.

Which is the beginning.

The second step Stanford says is to “fix the INSTITUTIONS” promoting gender equality through structural changes in organizations. Research has shown the institutions and systems themselves are inhospitable to women, to ‘others’, and will never be inclusively effective and efficient unless they are tweaked for systems change.

 

The third step is to “fix the knowledge” to stimulate excellence by integrating sex and gender analysis into research priorities, funding decisions, new methodologies, gathering and analyzing data, and then drafting policies that are truly gender-aware and gender-responsive.

 

So we have a bit of a way to go.

 

The good news is that here in Geneva we are no longer talking about the why or the what, but we are focused on the HOW. We are no longer trying to make the case for WHY; we embrace why gender equality is important. Women are 50% of the population and deserve representation at 50%.

We are no longer dithering about the what. The WHAT is gender equality. Pure and simple.

But we do need laser focus on the HOW. How do we make the most sustainable and transformative change?

 

 

I only have 5 minutes so we have prepared a recto verso sheet with the greatest hits of 2017.

Here’s some of what we have accomplished since January:

 

We hard launched our IGC-New York group led by Amb Jurg Lauber of Switzerland

A group that includes double Champion Antonio Guterres, Who recently suggested to his SRSGs that they join us, and now recommended to his Under Secretary Generals that they sign on.

We look forward to more Champions soon.

 

We launched an IGC-Vienna group that includes the Heads of all 5 agencies from the UN to the IAEA, CBTO, and UNIDO in Vienna; led by Slovenia, the US and Costa Rica. I was lucky enough to be with the Champions on Friday who send their best wishes, and look forward to opportunities and challenges they have to move this conversation forward in a new East West South North conversation .

 

IGC-Nairobi will soft launch next week at UNEA at Female Environment Ministers Breakfast headlined by Eric Solheim. At that launch we will have Jan Dusik & Elliot Harris Champions in Geneva and New York respectively, Geneva’s own Champions Inger Anderson of IUCN, and Ambassado Nazhat Khan of Fiji inspiring the group, and working towards their own cross hub, cross border Environment Impact group in 2018.

 

IGC-Bonn-Berlin will have its proper hard launch In the new year led by Patricia Espinosa

(who incidentally managed at COP with Ambassador Khan to pass the first ever Gender Action Plan for Climate Change after many years of discussion because they made gender one of their top priorities for COP).

 

In 2017, We have also welcomed our first Honorary Champions:

PresidentMichelle Bachelet of Chile and Foreign Minister Margot Wallstrom of Sweden

 

We published our first book: Shaping the International Agenda: Raising Women’s Voices in Intergovernmental Forums, a compendium of best practices for balanced delegations in collaboration with UN Women.

 

Held events collectively and as IGC, including a collaboration with IKnow Politics, a GENDER RESPONSIVE STANDARDS INITIATIVE, a reception for the new CEDAW Chair, a series of roundtables for focal points, and more.

 

We also redid the back end of the website. Created a Manual for sister Hubs, and are about to go through another deeper website redesign to become more of a resource and information hub on gender.

 

But perhaps the most interesting work has been on our Impact Groups.

 

Led by you as Champions, and conceived to create clear mandates for systems change.

Groups operational for the first time in 2017 were:

Representation led by Sweden, ILO, Afghanistan

Change Management as you heard led by the UK and UNAIDS

Health, a stand alone action that convened WHO EB members to sign a Call to Action for Gender Equality , which was also published in The Lancet

 

And, the TRADE Impact Group led by ITC, Sierra Leone and Iceland which has to take this year’s prize as poster child for IMPACT, and what can be accomplished when we focus and when we dare together.

As many of you know the TRADE GROUP, gathered for the first time in January putting together an initial core group of 13 that decided to go for a Declaration on Trade and Women’s Economic Empowerment on the margins of the WTO Ministerial in Buenos Aires in December.

We have 63 Member States and counting joining the Declaration, including all of your countries sitting here. The big work will then continue in 2018 with the recommendations set out in the Declaration

 

2 new Impact groups join us in 2018: Environment Impact: As I mentioned, our first cross border group

And Peace, Development & Humanitarian Affairs co-chaired by The Netherlands and Interpeace.

 

We hope all groups will set tangible and transformative actions to be accomplished in the course of 2018.

 

My time is up, but I look forward to having conversations about all this during the Reception and at any other time during the year!

 

Thank you !! Merci à vous, à toutes et tous!

And proud to deliver the following remarks:

REMARKS Annual Champions Meeting November 2017

Caitlin Kraft-Buchman Women@theTable

Bonsoir mes amis!

It’s a special honor for me as one of the three founders of International Gender Champions with Director General Michael Møller, and former US Ambassador Pam Hamamoto, to be here with you today and give a resume of what we’ve accomplished this year.

We’ve had a banner second year! We’ve spread the panel pledge throughout our buildings and our city making it unacceptable, if not yet obsolete, to have a single sex panel on any topic.

We’ve dug into our individual Commitments, that everyone will report on for the second time through the SURVEY that has just opened online to you and your focal points (We hope reflections on the Survey while you are filling it out inspire you to make even more ambitious commitments for 2018 than the ones made for this year.)

The 2017 Survey will serve as the data basis for the Annual Report launching IWD 2018

Indeed we now have so many gender equality conversations in Geneva we are planning to have an International Women’s Week ( instead of a Day ! this year so that we can really profile the amazing work of our movement instead of cramming it all into one exhausting too short day.

(And so we hope that you will all work together to give one day each to sectors such as Representation, Trade, Humanitarian gender Action, etc…)

We have seen expansion and new hubs and impact groups,

And this organic flow is what Stanford has determined to be the THREE essential steps in movement towards gender equality:

The very first step is to “fix the numbers of women”. Which we are trying to do with the Panel Pledge, with many of our commitments, and in particular with the SG’s parity strategy focusing on increasing women's participation.

Which is the beginning.

The second step Stanford says is to “fix the INSTITUTIONS” promoting gender equality through structural changes in organizations. Research has shown the institutions and systems themselves are inhospitable to women, to ‘others’, and will never be inclusively effective and efficient unless they are tweaked for systems change.

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